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Residential Water Damage Restoration 

Dealing with water damage can be a traumatic experience. You feel a loss of control in your own home! The feeling only gets worse if you have a company come in and rip apart your walls, carpet, furniture, and rummage through your personal items! After dealing with all this aggravation and more, you get “rewarded” with a bill for $1,000’s!

Relief Water Damage Restoration

Residential Water Damage Restoration

This does not have to be your experience with water damage.

Turn Off All Electricity- Turn your power main to the off position so you don’t get electrically shocked. Never step in standing water without the power off!

Identify the Type of Water- You must determine if your water is considered “clean” or “dirty.” Clean water comes from sources such as a failed sump pump or leaky dishwasher. Dirty water comes from sources like broken ejector pumps and cracked sewage lines.

Equipment and Materials- You will need water damage equipment such as a wet/dry vacuum, carpet cleaning machine, deodorizers, disinfectants, and body protection such as puncture proof gloves.

Remove the Water- Use either a submersible pump or wet/dry vacuum to remove the excess water.

Treat Your Carpet and/or Other Flooring- You must properly clean, disinfect, and deodorize the carpet.

Discard the Padding- Remove and trash all the padding under the carpet.

Treat Walls and Baseboards- Remove the baseboards and create air cavities in the walls. Properly disinfect and store the baseboards.

Ensure Your Furniture is Safe- Check for structural damage and if water affected absorbent areas.

Drying Equipment- You will need to use air movers, fans, and dehumidifiers after you finish the demolition and restoration process. These pieces of equipment will allow your home to dry properly.

Deal with Insurance Companies- After you remediate your water damage, you will have to deal with your insurance company and make sure the insurance company pays you the money you deserve!

Residential Water Damage Restoration In 

Water Damage Restoration Insurance Claim

Okay, so your pipes burst in your upstairs bathroom and you're standing hip deep in raw sewage. Who are you going to call?

Yellow Books in every city are replete with companies advertising water damage repair or restoration. The problem is that there are no government regulations regarding who can and cannot do this sort of work, so any redneck with a mop and a shop-vac can slap a sign on the side of his truck advertising water repair and say he's in the business. Choosing this guy to work on your home may actually make a bad situation worse and cost thousands of additional dollars to correct.

Fortunately, there is an answer. The Institute for Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC) was founded 30 years ago as the unofficial governing body for the water damage restoration industry. They have established guidelines, procedures, and standards for those companies who do this sort of work, and who wish to provide some measure of legitimacy.

Choosing a company that is IICRC certified will insure that they are licensed, bonded, and insured, on call 24/7, and staffed with highly trained professional technicians proficient in the latest water damage repair equipment and techniques. They will offer a complete range of services to handle all aspects of your repair needs, from water extraction and drying, to carpet cleaning and mold remediation, to structural repair and reconstruction.

They will also be able to serve as liaison with your insurance company or claims adjuster to make sure what is and is not covered by your homeowners policy.

So don't take chances with your home or possessions. Call a local IICRC certified water damage repair professional today.

Water Damage Restoration In 

Water Damage Restoration Cost

When you occupy your own home, it's much easier to take prompt action during plumbing mishaps than when you must rely on others. Landlords have no way of knowing that a pipe has burst, a water heater has toppled, or that rain is pouring through a leaking roof until they get that phone call from their tenant asking, "What do I do?" If you have rental property, water damage has the potential to become far costlier than it could have been due to renters who have less at stake or simply don't know what to do.

Instead of hoping the pipes will hold, educate your tenants about the actions that they should take should flooding or plumbing mishaps occur. Here are a few tips to help you get started.

First, create a small binder for each property that you own. This binder will act as a resource for your tenants and should include detailed information about a variety of concerns. Create tabbed sections and include a table of contents so that the tenants can quickly flip to the section, such as the water damage section, as needed. Include sections such as:

o Contact information and rental agreements - List contact numbers where you can be reached, including phone number, cell phone number, and e-mail address. Include a log sheet where renters can record their security deposit, rental payments, and related information.

o Maintenance - Create a sheet of standard maintenance that your renters are expected or authorized to handle. For example, do tenants need your permission before repairing leaking faucets? If not, how much money do you authorize for repairs before they must contact you? Include pockets for receipts along with reimbursement forms for authorized out-of-pocket repairs. Create a second sheet covering other maintenance requests, such as for repairing broken windows, repainting a room, or replacing water damaged carpets. Give detailed instructions on how to request repairs and improvements.

o Insurance Claims - Your insurance policy covers your rental property but not the renter's personal belongings. With this in mind, you may want to create a section covering insurance claims. Let the renter know that their personal belongings are not covered by your insurance policy and that they are responsible for obtaining coverage if desired. Detail the steps the policyholder must do when the property has been damaged - such as call you immediately, call 911 in emergencies, file a police report, and so on.

o Plumbing and Water Damage - Plumbing problems are among the most common problems tenants and landlords deal with. From garbage disposals that won't turn on to overflowing toilets and burst pipes and everything in between, your tenants will likely encounter some form of water or plumbing trouble. What should they do? In this section, you should list specific steps for minimizing the damage followed by instructions on what to do once the water has stopped flowing. Include the following information:

1. Detailed diagram and instructions showing the exact location of all water shut-off valves and how to turn off the water.

2. Safety precautions and warnings about electrocution.

3. Instructions on how to turn off the power.

4. Instructions on how to mop up the water. It's not a bad idea to invest in basic cleanup supplies and stock each rental property with a mop and bucket, absorbent towels and sponges, and a toilet plunger. This ensures that your tenants have the tools required to act quickly.

5. Instructions on what to do once the basic water issue has been somewhat contained, such as after shutting off the shut-off valve of an overflowing toilet and mopping up the water, what should the tenant do?

o Preferred Vendors - Home repairs will be necessary from time to time. If you have agreements with specific vendors or have vendors you trust and prefer to work with, this is an excellent place to list the information. It is also helpful for tenants as they will need to call to arrange service. List the phone numbers to preferred local handyman services, water damage restoration companies, pest control companies, electricians, roofing companies, plumbers, carpet cleaners, home improvement contractors, and so on. Provide pockets so that the tenant has a place to store contracts and receipts along with blank pages for writing down notes and estimates.

When it comes to taking care of your rental properties, it helps to keep your renters involved as they are on the front lines. When it comes to emergency repairs and water damage, renters need to know how to act promptly and safely and that you will take care of the necessary repairs. They also need to know that their prompt actions can minimize the damage and cause less disruption to their lives. This simple binder provides renters with the tools and information that they need to better help you keep your properties in tiptop shape.